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Movie Theater

Phoenix Picturehouse

33 locals recommend ·

Tips from locals

Cathy
Cathy
September 03, 2019
Lovely walk along the towpath to The Phoenix Picturehouse for a film. Lots of lovely restaurants in Jericho to choose from afterwards.
Melanie & Binnie
Melanie & Binnie
August 28, 2019
Great little cinema with a bar
Elizabeth
Elizabeth
April 11, 2018
An old-fashioned picture palace that shows a range of art house/foreign films.
Marc
Marc
March 27, 2018
Great little cinema with comfortable seats. good location.
Louise
Louise
February 25, 2018
independent cinema...comfortable seats and a bar upstairs

Unique things to do nearby

Places to stay nearby

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History Museum
“The Ashmolean Museum was named after its founder Elias Ashmole (1617–1692) and opened in 1683. It is widely recognised as being the first modern museum. Elias Ashmole was a royalist, lawyer, antiquarian, scholar, and collector who gave his collections to the University of Oxford in 1677. The Ashmolean Museum of Art and Archaeology on Beaumont Street, Oxford, England, is the world's first university museum. Its first building was erected in 1678–83 to house the cabinet of curiosities that Elias Ashmole gave to the University of Oxford in 1677. The present building was erected 1841–45. The museum reopened in 2009 after a major redevelopment. In November 2011, new galleries focusing on Egypt and Nubia were unveiled. In May 2016, the museum opened new galleries of 19th-century art.”
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Park
“70 acres of riverside parkland with areas for sport, plus a large collection of landscaped flora”
  • 40 locals recommend
Bar
“Awesome pub. Totally my local and wicked in the summer on front terrace or round the back with the dirty smokers, they also do some quality pies / pub food etc. Not the cheapest pub but worth it.”
  • 9 locals recommend
Field
“Port Meadow is a large meadow of open common land beside the River Thames to the north and west of Oxford, England. Horses in the mist on Port Meadow. The meadow is an ancient area of grazing land, still used for horses and cattle, and according to legend has never been ploughed, at least for around 4,000 years. It is said that in return for helping to defend the kingdom against the marauding Danes, the Freemen of Oxford were given the 300 acres (120 ha) of pasture next to the River Thames by Alfred the Great who, legend has it, founded the city in the 10th century (although Alfred actually died in the 9th century). The Freemen's collective right to graze their animals free of charge is recorded in the Domesday Book of 1086 and has been exercised ever since. The meadow runs from Jericho to Wolvercote (where north of the Shiplake Ditch it becomes Wolvercote Common) along the east (left) bank of the River Thames, with the Cotswold Line railway, the Oxford Canal and the suburb of North Oxford further to the east, and the village of Binsey to the west. Access to Port Meadow is via Walton Well Road or Aristotle Lane in the south (or from the south via Roger Dudman Way or the Thames Path) or from Godstow Road, Wolvercote via Wolvercote Common in the north. It is a typical English flood-meadow and is a favourite area for walking, with easy access from the city of Oxford. It is also a Site of Special Scientific Interest. At the southern end of the meadow is Fiddler's Island in the River Thames. In the winter the meadow sometimes floods; if frozen it forms a huge and relatively safe area for skating. In late spring vast areas are carpeted with buttercups. Horses, cattle and geese graze the meadow and many birds can often be seen. At the eastern edge of Port Meadow, just north of the entrance from Aristotle Lane, is Burgess Field, a reclaimed landfill site and home to a nature reserve. It covers an area of about 85 acres (34 hectares) and a circular path around the edge of the reserve takes you through some small copses.”
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Market
“The Covered Market is a historic market with permanent stalls and shops in a large covered structure in central Oxford, England. The market is located to the north of the High Street towards the western end between Cornmarket Street and Turl Street. To the north is Market Street. Most of the entrances are from the High Street and Market Street (with four entrances from each street). It is also possible to gain access from Cornmarket via the Golden Cross alley, with its small up-market shops. The Covered Market was officially opened on 1 November 1774 and is still active today. It was started in response to a general wish to clear 'untidy, messy and unsavoury stalls' from the main streets of central Oxford. John Gwynn, the architect of Magdalen Bridge, drew up the plans and designed the High Street front with its four entrances. In 1772, the newly formed Market committee, half of whose members came from the town and half from the university, accepted an estimate of nine hundred and sixteen pounds ten shillings, for the building of twenty butchers' shops. Twenty more soon followed, and after 1773 meat was allowed to be sold only inside the market. From this nucleus the market grew, with stalls for garden produce, pig meat, dairy products and fish.”
  • 47 locals recommend
Location
57 Walton Street
Oxford, OX2 6AE
Phone0871 902 5736