Klong Toey

Home to Bangkok's major port, largest wet market, and fairytale green space, Klong Toey is a local side of Bangkok many people miss.

Up at dawn and working until the next day's morning, fishing boats and fish markets thrive along the Chao Phraya River in Klong Toey. South of central Bangkok, Klong Toey shares the city center's inclinations for the delightfully haphazard and the certainly crowded. Serving as the city's largest port and home to its most expansive slum, Klong Toey has historically been an immigrant refuge and working individual's respite from mainstream Bangkok.

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On the Map

Klong Toey is bordered by Thong Lo, Lower Sukhumvit, Sathorn, Pathum Wan, Yan Nawa, Phra Khanong, Upper Sukhumvit, and Suan Luang

Suvarnabhumi Airport: 30 minute drive or 50 minutes with public transit and Airport Link
Siam BTS Skytrain Station: 30 minutes by pubic transit
Khao San Road: 50 minutes by public transit
Asok BTS Skytrain Station: 10 minutes by public transit

  • Public transit is Easy
  • Having a car is Possible

An Urban Fishing Village Along the Chao Phraya

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Downriver from central Bangkok, Klong Toey escapes the shadows of skyscrapers and embraces the shadows cast by colored awnings and ferry canopies.

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Mom-and-pop shops edge this riverside neighborhood's slender streets and contribute to its bustling port-town atmosphere.

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As street taxis and water taxis ferry people and goods throughout the neighborhood and further, Klong Toey's make-up becomes more and more mixed.

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Dock workers, commuters, farmers, shippers, and shop owners converge in Klong Toey.

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Bangkok's largest slum is located in Klong Toey, too.

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In Klong Toey, all of the neighborhood's residents are part of its fabric.

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It's all part of the neighborhood's reality.

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The sun still rises on Klong Toey.

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[Klong Toey is home to] a huge wet market, the biggest one in Bangkok. You can buy everything there from fruit and vegetables to seafood...If you want to taste the Thai way of life, you will find [it here] at economic prices."

Bangkok's Largest Wholesale Wet Market

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Named for the vast amounts of water used to wash its walkways and nourish its live flora and fauna, the wet market in Klong Toey draws locals and restaurant owners around the clock.

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Despite its 24 hour accessibility, its crowds seldom seem to thin.

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At times, it's chaotic.

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Always, it's pungent.

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Its small moments are the moments you'll mostly remember.

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It's easier to feel local at Klong Toey's wet market.

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Travelers don't often make it here.

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Many Klong Toey inhabitants make it a daily ritual.

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There's a park near Emporium...it has a great childrens play area and we took our daughter to play there every morning."
Pixel

Stephanie

Visited in 2012

Klong Toey's Exchanges, Convention Centers, and Stadiums

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Convention centers and sports stadiums rise along the water's edge in Klong Toey.

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From book fairs to dance competitions and professional conferences, the Queen Sirikit Convention Center hosts a multitude of events.

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The national Stock Exchange of Thailand also calls Klong Toey home.

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Muay Thai matches take place at the Lumpinee Boxing Stadium on Tuesdays, Fridays, and Saturdays.

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Am nuay phawn.

Community Activism In Klong Toey

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Klong Toey residents have historically experienced discrimination when entering the workplace. The Helping Hands organization supports Klong Toey's inhabitants and slum dwellers with micro-lending initiatives so they can start their own small businesses.

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Poo's Cooking School takes visitors on interactive tours to Thai markets and then leads cooking demonstrations at their school in Klong Toey's slum.

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Helping Hands' most recent initiative, Munjai Cafe, offers Klong Toey's residents a way to learn the skill of coffee and beverage making.

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Munjai means "confidence," and that's what Munjai Cafe hopes to cultivate in its students.

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The cafe serves as a stepping stone to future employment opportunities.

Bang Krachao: The Green Lungs of Bangkok

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A 10 minute ferry from Klong Toey, Bang Krachao park flourishes with mangrove trees and lush orchards.

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Hidden away from the rest of Bangkok, Bang Krachao feels like another world.

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Its vast expanses of tropical greenery are popular among cyclists.

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Ferries headed for Bangkok's "Green Lungs" leave room for bikes.

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Photography

Airbnb works with local photographers to capture the spirit of neighborhoods all around the world. The photography on this page includes work by:

Nic Dunlop

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Nic Dunlop is a Bangkok-based photographer and writer represented by Panos Pictures in London. In 1999, he received an award from the John Hopkins University for Excellence in International Journalism for his discovery and exposure of Pol Pot's chief executioner Comrade Duch, a story told in his book, 'The Lost Executioner'. He also co-directed the Emmy nominated HBO film 'Burma Soldier'. His new book, 'Brave New Burma' spans 20 years of his photographs of Burma's crisis.

Paula Bronstein

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Paula Bronstein is an award winning photojournalist with over 30 years in the business. Originally from Boston, Bronstein worked for newspapers including The Hartford Courant and The Chicago Tribune before moving overseas to Thailand in 1998 to cover the Asian region including Afghanistan and Pakistan. Paula has been employed as a senior staff photographer with Getty Images for 10.5 years. Presently Paula has moved back to freelance and is being represented by Reportage by Getty Images.