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Sightseeing and landmarks in Oxford

History museums

History Museum
“We love to visit when we’re in Oxford. Its free entry and has a super restaurant and roof top bar”
  • 119 locals recommend
History Museum
“Excellent natural history Museum with the added bonus of the Pitt Rivers which is an anthropological collection that is amazing and not to be missed.”
  • 46 locals recommend
History Museum
“Beautiful architecture and space. Fantastic exhibition and some excellent events.”
  • 34 locals recommend
History Museum
“Fabulous all year round, free entry especially great if the British weather lets you down.”
  • 39 locals recommend
Castle
“Oxford Castle is a large, partly ruined Norman medieval castle on the western side of central Oxford in Oxfordshire, England. Most of the original moated, wooden motte and bailey castle was replaced in stone in the late 12th or early 13th century and the castle played an important role in the conflict of the Anarchy. In the 14th century the military value of the castle diminished and the site became used primarily for county administration and as a prison. The surviving rectangular St George's Tower is now believed to pre-date the remainder of the castle and be a watch tower associated with the original Saxon west gate of the city. Most of the castle was destroyed in the English Civil War and by the 18th century the remaining buildings had become Oxford's local prison. A new prison complex was built on the site from 1785 onwards and expanded in 1876; this became HM Prison Oxford. The prison closed in 1996 and was redeveloped as a hotel and visitor attraction. The medieval remains of the castle, including the motte and St George's Tower and crypt, are Grade I listed buildings and a Scheduled Monument.”
  • 14 locals recommend
History Museum

Scenic lookouts

Field
“Christ Church Meadow is a well-known flood-meadow, and popular walking and picnic spot in Oxford, England. Roughly triangular in shape it is bounded by the River Thames (the stretch through Oxford being known as "The Isis"), the River Cherwell, and Christ Church. The meadow provides access to many of the college boat houses which are on an island at the confluence of the two rivers. The lower sections of the meadow, close to the Thames, are grazed by cattle, while the upper sections have sports fields. Broad Walk is at the northern edge with Merton Field to the north and Merton College, dominated by the tower of Merton College Chapel, beyond that.”
  • 32 locals recommend
Scenic Lookout
“Carfax Tower has the second best view in Oxford. At the top, you’ll see the historic spires and domes of the city in the background with the shopping streets in the foreground. Carfax Tower is all the remains of an historic Oxford church, St Martin’s. Inside the tower there are still church bells and on the outside there’s a fancy clock with figures that chime the quarter hour. ”
  • 6 locals recommend

Historic sites

Market
“The Covered Market is a historic market with permanent stalls and shops in a large covered structure in central Oxford, England. The market is located to the north of the High Street towards the western end between Cornmarket Street and Turl Street. To the north is Market Street. Most of the entrances are from the High Street and Market Street (with four entrances from each street). It is also possible to gain access from Cornmarket via the Golden Cross alley, with its small up-market shops. The Covered Market was officially opened on 1 November 1774 and is still active today. It was started in response to a general wish to clear 'untidy, messy and unsavoury stalls' from the main streets of central Oxford. John Gwynn, the architect of Magdalen Bridge, drew up the plans and designed the High Street front with its four entrances. In 1772, the newly formed Market committee, half of whose members came from the town and half from the university, accepted an estimate of nine hundred and sixteen pounds ten shillings, for the building of twenty butchers' shops. Twenty more soon followed, and after 1773 meat was allowed to be sold only inside the market. From this nucleus the market grew, with stalls for garden produce, pig meat, dairy products and fish.”
  • 47 locals recommend
Botanical Garden
“The University of Oxford Botanic Garden is the oldest botanic garden in Great Britain and one of the oldest scientific gardens in the world. The garden was founded in 1621 as a physic garden growing plants for medicinal research. Today it contains over 6,000 different plant species on 1.8 ha (4 1⁄2 acres). It is one of the most diverse yet compact collections of plants in the world and includes representatives from over 90% of the higher plant families. Simon Hiscock became Horti Praefectus in 2015. His predecessor, Timothy Walker, served from 1988 to 2014.[3”
  • 27 locals recommend
Plaza
“The most beautiful library in the world, set in one of the most beautiful squares in the world.”
  • 7 locals recommend
Scenic Lookout
“Carfax Tower has the second best view in Oxford. At the top, you’ll see the historic spires and domes of the city in the background with the shopping streets in the foreground. Carfax Tower is all the remains of an historic Oxford church, St Martin’s. Inside the tower there are still church bells and on the outside there’s a fancy clock with figures that chime the quarter hour. ”
  • 6 locals recommend
Plaza
  • 1 local recommends

Libraries

College Library
“The Bodleian Library is the main research library of the University of Oxford, and is one of the oldest libraries in Europe. With over 12 million items, it is the second-largest library in Britain after the British Library. Under the Legal Deposit Libraries Act 2003 it is one of six legal deposit libraries for works published in the United Kingdom, and under Irish law it is entitled to request a copy of each book published in the Republic of Ireland. Known to Oxford scholars as "Bodley" or "the Bod", it operates principally as a reference library and, in general, documents may not be removed from the reading rooms. In 2000, a number of libraries within the University of Oxford were brought together for administrative purposes under the aegis of what was initially known as Oxford University Library Services (OULS), and since 2010 as the Bodleian Libraries, of which the Bodleian Library is the largest component. All colleges of the University of Oxford have their own libraries, which in a number of cases were established well before the foundation of the Bodleian, and all of which remain entirely independent of the Bodleian. They do, however, participate in OLIS (Oxford Libraries Information System), the Bodleian Libraries' online union catalogue. Much of the library's archives were digitized and put online for public access in 2015.”
  • 38 locals recommend
Library
“The Radcliffe Camera is a building of Oxford University, England, designed by James Gibbs in neo-classical style and built in 1737–49 to house the Radcliffe Science Library”
  • 8 locals recommend
Library
“The Weston Library (formerly the New Bodleian) is the home of the Bodleian Libraries' special collections. Reopened in 2015 following a spectacular refurbishment, visitors can enjoy its new public spaces and discover more about the Bodleian's treasures. Here you can see free exhibitions in two large galleries, view displays, attend talks and events then take a break at the cafe or visit the shop.”
  • 4 locals recommend
Library
“Offers public access to books, newspapers and magazines, audio books and ebooks, local study resources, PCs, free WiFi, printing and copying services. ”
  • 2 locals recommend
Library
“At the John Radcliffe Hospital there is an "Oxonbikes" bike hire point. Please see online for "oxonbikes" for more information.”
  • 1 local recommends
Library
  • 1 local recommends
Library
Library
  • 1 local recommends
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