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Best things to do in Mandalay Region

Discover the city according to locals. Find the best things to do, places to eat, and get priceless advice from the people who live here.

Natural Feature
“Mandalay Hill is a 240 metres (790 ft) hill that is located to the northeast of the city centre of Mandalay in Myanmar. The city took its name from the hill. Mandalay Hill is known for its abundance of pagodas and monasteries, and has been a major pilgrimage site for Burmese Buddhists for nearly two centuries. At the top of the hill is the Sutaungpyei (literally wish-fulfilling) Pagoda. A panoramic view of Mandalay from the top of Mandalay Hill alone makes it worthwhile to attempt a climb up its stairways. There are four covered stairways called saungdan leading up the hill from the south, southeast, west and north, and convenient seats of masonry work line these stairways all the way up. A one-way motor road today saves time and also makes it accessible for those who are unable to climb up the stairs, leading to an escalator and a lift to the pagoda at the summit. ”
1 local recommends
Restaurant
Place of Worship
Place of Worship
Buddhist Temple
1 local recommends
Place of Worship
Country
“Myanmar (myan-mar[5] Listeni/miɑːnˈmɑːr/ mee-ahn-mar,[6] /miˈɛnmɑːr/ mee-en-mar or /maɪˈænmɑːr/ my-an-mar (also with the stress on first syllable); Burmese pronunciation: [mjəmà]),[nb 1][7][8][9][10] officially the Republic of the Union of Myanmar and also known as Burma, is a sovereign state in Southeast Asia bordered by Bangladesh, India, China, Laos and Thailand. One-third of Myanmar's total perimeter of 1,930 km (1,200 miles) forms an uninterrupted coastline along the Bay of Bengal and the Andaman Sea. The country's 2014 census revealed a much lower population than expected, with 51 million people recorded.[11] Myanmar is 676,578 square kilometres (261,227 sq mi) in size. Its capital city is Naypyidaw and its largest city is Yangon (Rangoon).[1] Early civilisations in Myanmar included the Tibeto-Burman-speaking Pyu city-states in Upper Burma and the Mon kingdoms in Lower Burma.[12] In the 9th century, the Bamar people entered the upper Irrawaddy valley and, following the establishment of the Pagan Kingdom in the 1050s, the Burmese language, culture and Theravada Buddhism slowly became dominant in the country. The Pagan Kingdom fell due to the Mongol invasions and several warring states emerged. In the 16th century, reunified by the Taungoo Dynasty, the country was for a brief period the largest empire in the history of Southeast Asia.[13] The early 19th century Konbaung Dynasty ruled over an area that included modern Myanmar and briefly controlled Manipur and Assam as well. The British conquered Myanmar after three Anglo-Burmese Wars in the 19th century and the country became a British colony. Myanmar became an independent nation in 1948, initially as a democratic nation and then, following a coup d'état in 1962, a military dictatorship. For most of its independent years, the country has been engrossed in rampant ethnic strife and Burma's myriad ethnic groups have been involved in one of the world's longest-running ongoing civil wars. During this time, the United Nations and several other organisations have reported consistent and systematic human rights violations in the country.[14][15][16] In 2011, the military junta was officially dissolved following a 2010 general election, and a nominally civilian government was installed. While former military leaders still wield enormous power in the country, Burmese Military have taken steps toward relinquishing control of the government. This, along with the release of Aung San Suu Kyi and political prisoners, has improved the country's human rights record and foreign relations, and has led to the easing of trade and other economic sanctions.[17][18] There is, however, continuing criticism of the government's treatment of the Muslim Rohingya minority and its poor response to the religious clashes.[19][20][21] In the landmark 2015 election, Aung San Suu Kyi's party won a majority in both houses, starting the country on a path to true democracy. Myanmar is a country rich in jade and gems, oil, natural gas and other mineral resources. In 2013, its GDP (nominal) stood at US$56.7 billion and its GDP (PPP) at US$221.5 billion.[3] The income gap in Myanmar is among the widest in the world, as a large proportion of the economy is controlled by supporters of the former military government.[22][23] As of 2013, according to the Human Development Index (HDI), Myanmar had a low level of human development, ranking 150 out of 187 countries. In 1989, the military government officially changed the English translations of many names dating back to Burma's colonial period or earlier, including that of the country itself: "Burma" became "Myanmar". The renaming remains a contested issue.[24] Many political and ethnic opposition groups and countries continue to use "Burma" because they do not recognise the legitimacy of the ruling military government or its authority to rename the country.[25] The country's official full name is the "Republic of the Union of Myanmar" (ပြည်ထောင်စုသမ္မတ မြန်မာနိုင်ငံတော်, Pyidaunzu Thanmăda Myăma Nainngandaw, pronounced: [pjìdàʊɴzṵ θàɴməda̰ mjəmà nàɪɴŋàɴdɔ̀]). Countries that do not officially recognise that name use the long form "Union of Burma" instead.[26][27] In English, the country is popularly known as either "Burma" or "Myanmar" Listeni/ˈmjɑːnˌmɑːr/.[6] Both these names are derived from the name of the majority Burmese Bamar ethnic group. Myanmar is considered to be the literary form of the name of the group, while Burma is derived from "Bamar", the colloquial form of the group's name. Depending on the register used, the pronunciation would be Bama (pronounced: [bəmà]) or Myamah (pronounced: [mjəmà]). The name Burma has been in use in English since the 18th century. Ancient Hindu Sanskrit scriptures of India like Vedas mention Burma as ब्रह्मावर्त / ब्रह्मदेश (Brahmavart/Brahmadesh). It denotes 'Land of Hindu god Bramha'. Burma continues to be used in English by the governments of many countries, such as Australia, Canada”
2 locals recommend
Place of Worship
“The Phaungdawoo Pagoda is one of the most recognized shrines in Myanmar. In fact, it is the most sacred pagoda in the whole southern Shan State. It is found in Inle Lake, in the main boat landing in Ywama. The name 'Phaungdawoo' means ‘front of the raft’ in Burmese. The Phaungdawoo is home to five Buddha images, which were said to be donated by King Alaung Sithu. The pagoda was built for the purpose of keeping these Buddha images. A small entrance fee applies. Location: Ywama Village, Inle Lake. Phaung Daw Oo Pagoda Festival is the most anticipated and significant religious event in Inle Lake, it can be considered as an attraction in its own right.The 18-day event includes a grand procession of Buddha images , a boat race and other activities. Four of the five Buddha images in the Phaung Daw Oo Pagoda are transported on a royal barge which is pulled by big Inle traditional boats.The festival is generally held in September or October ,depending on Myanmar calender. ”
1 local recommends
Restaurant
“Sisson's Restaurant & Heritage Bar situated at the Kalaw Heritage Hotel is serving delicious Local & International Dishes, great cocktails with a wide beer selection.”
2 locals recommend
Restaurant
2 locals recommend
Place of Worship
“The Mahamuni Buddha Temple is a Buddhist temple and major pilgrimage site, located southwest of Mandalay, Myanmar. The Mahamuni Buddha image is deified in this temple, and originally came from Arakan. It is highly venerated in Burma and central to many people's lives, as it is seen as an expression of representing the Buddha's life.”
1 local recommends
Buddhist Temple