BAIRRO ALTO FADO

Apartment - Entire home/apt · Rua do Diário de Notícias, Lisbon, Lisbon 1200, Portugal

Located in the heart of the famous Bairro Alto quarter , the pedestrian Rua Diário de Noticias, lies close to the most trendy shopping area of Lisbon. Very quiet during the day this street is transformed at night into one of the most vibrant nightl

The Space

Located in the heart of the famous Bairro Alto quarter , the pedestrian Rua Diário de Noticias, lies close to the most trendy shopping area of Lisbon. Very quiet during the day this street is transformed at night into one of the most vibrant nightlife city streets.
Behind colorful façades you will find a variety of excellent traditional and international restaurants, tourist-packed Fado Houses, and a multitude of sleek bars and stylish alternative fashion shops that stay open until late at night. Throughout the week, and especially on weekends you'll find people of all ages backgrounds and lifestyles.
This privileged quarter offers you a very interesting mixture between tradition and modern. In the neighbourhood you have old portuguese shops as well as new bars, galleries and fine restaurants. We recommend you to visit the new restored garden square Principe Real only a few steps upstreet. After a relaxed stroll through Rua Dom Pedro V with some of Lisbon's best shops you'll arrive at Lisbon's great viewpoint Miradouro de São Pedro de Alcantara. From here you'll have a fantastic view of old Lisbon from Bairro Alto all the way to the castle of São Jorge. At night this is unforgettable.

You'll reach the next tram stop within 3 min, the metro station Baixa/Chiado within 5 min and three public car parks within 3 min. walking distances.
The fully renovated residence is located on 2nd floor of a charming house of the seventeenth century. This apartment comprises two bedrooms, a large room, a dining room, a bathroom and a fully equipped kitchen. From the balcony in the living room you can enjoy a beautiful view over the neighborhood, or on the back of the house enjoy the calm overlooking a green courtyard.
- 2 Bedrooms
- 1 Bathroom
- 1 Living room
- 1 kitchen fully equipped
- Free high speed WI-FI
- Satellite TV and DVD
- Crib for babies up to 3 years old
- Baby stroller
Towels and sheets are included.
* DISTANCES TO:
Subway: 100m (1-min walk)
Avenida da Liberdade:1 km;
Rossio: 0,5 km (10 min walk)
Jeronimos/Belem: 5 km ( nearby train)
* TRAVEL:
Lisbon airport is just 15 minutes away. A taxi
from the airport should not cost more than
15 euros.
* ACTIVITIES IN THE VICINITY:
Theaters, cinema, museums, botanical
garden, farmer's market (saturdays), castle,
coliseum, churches and a lot more.
* CLEANING:
Clean towels, linens and sheets are provided
once a week.
We would love to host you in our home. If you have any questions, please don't hesitate to contact. We look forward to welcoming you!
Feel free to send a message with any questions!
See you soon,
Diana & Rodrigo
Lisbon's soulful sound - FADO
Portugal has a diverse musical culture - from the French Provençal strain in the folkmusic of the north of the country, to Fado, the country's national musical treasure.
There are two basic styles of Fado: Lisbon and Coimbra. In Lisbon it is always sung by a solo performer, while in Coimbra it is often performed by groups of male university students. They are accompanied by two guitarists, one playing the melody on a twelve-stringed Portuguese guitar (descendant of the English guitar introduced into Portugal by the British community in Porto in the 19th century), and the other supplying the rhythm on the six-stringed viola. The intensely melancholic songs are usually about love, woes, and pains, or express sadness and longing for things that were lost or that were never accomplished, but in Coimbra, it also occasionally contains humor and political undertones.
Even musical experts cannot agree on the true origin of Fado. Although the word comes from the Latin fatum, meaning fate, some believe its drawn-out laments is a legacy of the Moorish occupation. Others say it developed from an African dance in Brazil, and according to another theory, the melancholy character of the music evolved from Portuguese seafarers who sang of home during their long absenses at sea.
It emerged as a bohemian art form in Lisbon's working-class districts of Alfama and Mouraria in the late 18th century, and gradually moved up-market. It became popular with the singer Maria Severa, who died at the age of 26 and later became the subject of Portugal's first sound movie in 1931. To this day, female performers wear a black shawl in her memory and her life story has been the influence of several Fado songs, poems, novels, and plays.
But it was Amalia Rodrigues in the 20th century who made Fado known beyond Portugal, performing all over Europe, Japan, South America, and even in the United States, in New York's "La Vie en Rose" in the 1950s. She's been credited with defining the style of the music, and when she died in 1999, the government declared three days of national mourning and awarded her a state funeral. As a national icon, she is buried in Lisbon's National Pantheon.
Her CD "The Art of Amalia" is one of the best introductions to Fado. For contemporary recordings, the best choices are Mariza's "Fado em Mim," "Transparente", and "Fado Curvo".
Mariza is a multiple Grammy nominee and has won the Best European Act at the BBC World Music Awards. She is considered the new "Queen of Fado." In 2007 she went on a world tour that included a well-publicized concert in Los Angeles' Walt Disney Hall (with a stage designed by Frank Gehry just for her concert), and an appearance on the David Letterman Show (see the video below).
When visiting Lisbon, spending a night at a "casa de Fado" or Fado restaurant is an essential experience. There are many in the Bairro Alto district
Also consider Clube de Fado or Parreirinha de Alfama in Alfama. Or see Ana Marina sing in the small & friendly Sr. Fado in the same area.
But for the very best Fado experience, head to Senhor Vinho in the Lapa district.
There's usually a cover charge of between 15 and 20 euros, which when added to dinner, makes a night of Fado cost around 50 euros. It is a good idea to make reservations, especially on weekends.
There are probably about two dozen Fado clubs in the city, but only a few are a true cultural experience. When asked where to go, most locals will probably recommend one of the few listed on the menu to the left. Click on the links to know what you can expect in each.
If you are interested in knowing more about the history of Fado, visit the Fado Museum.

The Neighborhood

The main commercial streets are Rua do Norte, Rua da Atalaia, and Rua do Diario de Noticias, from where it is easy to reach Miradouro de São Pedro de Alcântara (a garden-terrace with a panoramic view over the city), and two of the city's most interesting c

erior and the romantic Gothic ruins of Carmo Church.

Chiado shops Neighboring CHIADO is an elegant, sophisticated district of theaters, bookshops, old-style cafes, art nouveau jewelry shops, luxurious international names such as Hermes, and local treasures such as the opulently gilded Tavares Rico Restaurant opened in 1784, the fine porcelain shop Vista Alegre, or one of Portugal's international fashion designers, Ana Salazar.

Much of the area was destroyed in a fire in 1988, but has since been reborn. It remains one of Lisbon's most beloved districts, with reminders of its past as the center of the city's intellectual life, with statues of literary figures such as Fernando Pessoa, Luis de Camões, and Eça de Queiroz.

Getting around

The Famous Tram nº28 runs in between Bairro Alto and Bica.

Room type: Entire home/apt
Bed type: Real Bed
Accommodates: 4
Bedrooms: 2
Bathrooms: 1
Beds: 4
Extra people: $14 / night after 2 guests
Minimum Stay: 2 nights
Monthly Price: $1992 /month
Cleaning Fee: $36
Check Out: 11:00 AM
Country:
City:
Neighborhood:
Cancellation: Strict

Overall Guest Satisfaction

Accuracy
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Value
  • This apartment is very well located, quiet to sleep, good furniture, very beautiful decoration, and has good linens and towels. Rodrigo and his mother were very collaborative. I recommend it!

    April 2014
  • This time, we brought along my sister and her friend. We had plenty of room for the 4 of us. The level of decoration and that Rodrigo has put into the unit is perfect. We felt like we were truly living in an incredibly entertaining part of town.

    Rodrigo is the perfect host. He worked around our early flights and late departures by allowing us to both check-in early on Friday and check-out late on Monday. This was much appreciated!

    March 2014
  • We had a great time in Lisboa. The apartment is in the best area to stay surrounded by many Bars and great restaurants and very close to the most sight seeing and shopping spots.
    We also loved the interior in the apartment. Everything was clean and good smelling, also the hosts were very friendly and always reachable.
    We really felt like home and didn’t want to leave :-) we truly recommend this apartment.

    March 2014
  • We had a fabulous time at Diana and Rodrigo's (website hidden) was spacious, well decorated and spotless.The location was ideal, close to restaurants, stores and (email hidden)drigo was very accommodating.he came right away when I arrived and helped me in an emergency.
    We recommend the place to visit Lisbon.
    Thank you Rodrigo .
    Andree, Gilles and Josy

    March 2014
  • The reservation was canceled 5 days before arrival. This is an automated posting.

    February 2014
  • Centrally located with everything provided, we enjoyed our stay. Well isolated from noise in bedrooms (dispite animation outside at night).
    Clean and well accoodated appartment. Good place to stay for a family with children.

    January 2014
  • A beautiful, cosy, and warm flat in the heart of Bairro Alto.

    The photos really show the flat as it is: well lighted, and comfortable place you will truly enjoy. In our five day stay, this really grew on us and became a home away from home.

    We stayed there during January, which is relatively cold period for Lisbon standards. The flat, however, came with three space heaters that did their job splendidly, so the place was quickly very warm and cosy.

    Functional kitchen, nice bathroom. Very clean, well lit, and airy.

    The flat sits above a bar which can get very lively and noisy even during the weekdays, but this didn't disturb our sleep, because the bedrooms are on the other side of the building, and if you close the double glazed windows and doors, you will have absolutely no problems sleeping.

    The hosts were also really nice, and thoughtful. A great example of their thoughtfulness of small details was the umbrella that they left in the flat for us to use, which was an absolute lifesaver in a rainy January Lisbon.

    Also, it was really nice that the mini hi-fi had an AUX input, so we could play our own music in the flat (bring a 3.5mm stereo jack though!), which was really nice.

    The TV has an HDMI input, so you can connect your laptop if you want to have a quiet night and watch a movie. You may need to bring your cable, though (we didn't have to, as we could use the one that connected the set-top box with the TV).

    The price compared quite well with the competition.

    All in all, I would stay at this place again, and I've already recommended it to my friends that are visiting Lisbon later this year.

    January 2014
  • Great appartment. Super clean and with everything you need. Great location.

    January 2014
    Diana & Rodrigo
    Response from Diana & Rodrigo:

    Thank you for your kind comment!

    January 2014
  • This was a great apartment- very centrally located, newly redone, and very comfortable for three people. There was some street noise on Saturday night and the apartment was a bit cold in December without central heat (they did provide two space heaters and blankets). But these aren't unique to this apartment and were really minor. Also, Rodrico answered our many questions very quickly and even met us late on Saturday night after our flight was delayed. Highly recommended!

    December 2013
    Diana & Rodrigo
    Response from Diana & Rodrigo:

    Thank You Danny!

    December 2013
  • We had a wonderfull time in this appartment and enjoyed the city very much. Fantastic location - incredibly central in a very busy part of the old town, the best place to go out in the night!!
    The appartment is very lovely, clean and well equipped - you will get everything there. Definetly the best place to stay in Lisboa. Thank you so much for having us there!!

    December 2013
    Diana & Rodrigo
    Response from Diana & Rodrigo:

    Dear Veera, it was great to have you in our apartment and we are so glad you enjoy it. Thank so much for your comment and we will be more than happy to have you in next time you visit Lisbon. :-) Kind regards, Diana & Rodrigo

    December 2013
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Languages
English, Español, Français, Italiano, Português
School
Filipa de Lencastre, New University of Lisbon
Work
VDE
About
I enjoy being an airbnb host, so that people visiting the city, can live like a local for the duration of their stay. My husband Rodrigo and I have a passion for travel. Whenever we go somewhere, be it here in Portugal, or a foreign country, we leave the traditional tourist path, in search of a typical neighborhood where the real people live. There's no better travel experience than learning about a country, region, or city, from someone who calls it HOME. I´m a consulting manager in a medical care entreprise. I have a degree in Chemistry Engeneering in FCT - Universidade Nova de Lisboa. I´m a snowboard FAN. FADO HISTORY Born in the popular contexts of the 1800s Lisbon, Fado was present in convivial and leisure moments. Happening spontaneously, its execution took place indoors or outdoors, in gardens, bullfights, retreats, streets and alley, taverns,cafés de camareiras and casas de meia-porta. Evoking urban emergence themes, singing the daily narratives, Fado is profoundly related to social contexts ruled by marginality and transgression in a first phase, taking place in locations visited by prostitutes, faias, sailors, coachmen and marialvas. Often surprised in prison, its actors - the singers - are described in the faia figure, a fado singer guy, a bully of a rough and hoarse voice with tattoos and skilled with a flick knife who spoke using slang. As we will see, fado’s association to society’s most marginal spheres would definitely make the Portuguese intellectuals reject it profoundly. Stating the communion of ludic spaces between the bohemian aristocracy and the most disfavoured fringes of Lisbon’s population, the history of fado crystallized into myth the episode of the amorous relationship between the Count Vimioso and Maria Severa Onofriana (phone number hidden)), a prostitute consecrated by her singing talents, who would soon transform into one of greatest myths of the History of Fado. In successive image and sound reprises, the allusion to the involvement between a bohemian aristocrat with the fado singing prostitute would cross several sung poems and even the cinema and the theatre or the visual arts - beginning with the novel A Severa, by Júlio Dantas, published in 1901 and transported to the silver screen in 1931 - the first Portuguese sound film, directed by Leitão de Barros. Fado would also conquer ground in festive events connected to the citys popular calendar, beneficence parties or cegadas - amateur and popular theatrical presentations generally performed by men on the street, in night feats, and popular associations. Although this sort of presentation was a famous entertaining form of Lisbon’s Carnival, enjoying popular support and often with strong intervening characters, the censorship regulation in 1927 would strongly but irreversibly contribute to the extinction of this type of show. The Teatro de Revista [a sort of vaudeville theatre], a typical theatre genre from Lisbon born in 1851, would soon discover fado’s potential. In 1870, fado began to appear in its music scenes and from there projects itself to a broader audience. Lisbon’s social e cultural context, with its typical neighbourhoods, and bohemia, assumed an absolute protagonism in Teatro de Revista. Ascending to the theatre stages, fado would animate the Revista, developing new themes and melodies. Teatro de Revista was orchestrated and filled with refrains. Fado would be sung by famous actresses, and renowned fado singers, singing their repertoires. Two different approaches to fado would become recorded in history: the danced fado stylized by Francis and the spoken fado of João Villaret. A central figure in the history of Fado, Hermínia Silva conquered fame on the theatre stages in the 1930s and 1940s, adding her unmistakable singing gifts to those of a comical actress and revisteira. Fado’s appropriation field broadened in the last quarter of the 19th century. This was the time of the formal stabilization of the poetic form of the “ten-verse stanza”, a quatrain made of four stanzas of ten verses each, on which fado would get its structure and later develop into other variants. This is also the period of the definition of the Portuguese guitar - progressively diffused from the urban centres to the country’s rural areas - in its specific component as fado companion. In the first decades of the 20th century, fado began to be gradually divulged and gained popular consecration through the publication of periodicals on the subject and the consolidation of new performing venues in a broad network that began incorporating Fado in its agenda with a commercial perspective, fixating private casts which would often form embassies or artistic groups for tours. In parallel the relationship of Fado with the theatre stages was consolidated and the performances by fado singers at Revistas musical scenes and operettas multiplied. In fact, the appearance of fado singing professional companies in the 1930s allowed promoting shows with great casts and their circulation in theatres north and south of the country, and even in international tours. That was the case of “Grupo Artístico de Fados”, with Berta Car(phone number hidden)), Madalena de Mel(phone number hidden)), Armando Augusto Freire, (phone number hidden)) Martinho d’Assunçã(phone number hidden)) and João da Mata, and “Grupo Artístico Propaganda do Fado”, with Deonilde Gouveia (phone number hidden)), Júlio Proença (phone number hidden)) and Joaquim Campos (phone number hidden)), or “Troupe Guitarra de Portugal”, with Ercília Costa (phone number hidden)) and Alfredo Marceneir(phone number hidden)) among others. Although the first discographic records produced in Portugal date from the beginning of the 20th century, at this stage the national market was still very incipient since it was quite expensive to buy gramophones and records. Effectively, the fundamental conditions for recording sound appeared after the invention of the electric microphone in 1925. At the same time, gramophones started being made at more competitive prices. And thus were created more favourable conditions to this market among the middle class. In the context of the mediatization instruments of Fado, TSF - wireless telegraphy - had a central importance in the first decades of the 20th century. Among the intense activity of radio broadcasting stations between 1925 and 1935, we highlight CT1AA, Rádio Clube Português, Rádio Graça and Rádio Luso - this last one quickly becoming popular for favouring fado. The broadcasts of the first Portuguese radio station, CT1AA, began in 1925. Investing on technical and logistic infrastructures which guaranteed it the expansion of its broadcast range and the broadcasts regularity, CT1AA of Abílio Nunes incorporated fado in its broadcasts, conquering a large group of listeners, including in the Portuguese emigration diaspora. With live feeds from the Theatres and musical live presentations at the studios, CT1AA also promoted the broadcast of an experimental fado show directed by the Spanish guitar player Amadeu Ramin. With the military coup of the 28 May 1926 and the implementation of previous censorship on public shows, the press and other publications, the urban song would suffer profound changes. In fact, in the following year the Decree Law Number 13 564 of 6 May 1927 globally regulated the show activities through extensive clauses; defending a “superior supervision of all the houses and show venues or public entertaining (...) by the General Inspection of Theatres and its delegates in behalf of the Public Instruction Ministry” on its 200 articles. Fado suffered unavoidable changes. The legal instrument regulated on the attribution of licenses to the companies which promoted shows at the most diversified venues, authorship rights, mandatory previous viewing of shows and sung repertoires, specific regulation for attributing the professional card, contracts, and tour travelling, among many other subjects. Significant mutations were so imposed on the performing venues, on the way interpreters presented themselves, and on the sung repertoires - striped of any improvised character - cementing a professionalization process of several interpreters, instrument players, song writers and composers, who were then performing at several venues before an increasing audience. The hearing of fados would gradually become ritualized at fado houses, places which concentrated in the city’s historic neighbourhoods, mainly in Bairro Alto, especially since the 1930s. These transformations in the fado production would necessarily drift it apart from improvise, loosing some of its original performing contexts diversity and imposing the specialization of interpreters, authors and musicians. In parallel, the discographic and radio recordings proposed a triage of voices and performing practices that were imposed as models, thus limiting improvise. The next decade, the revivalism trends of the so called typical features would definitely prevail, leading to a replication of the most genuine and picturesque in fado’s performing venues. Fado was present in the theatre and the radio since their first moments and the same would happen in the Seventh Art. In fact, the appearance of sound films was marked by the musical genre and the Portuguese cinema gave special attention to fado. Proving it, the theme of the first Portuguese sound film, directed by Leitão de Barros in 1931, was the misfortunes of the mythical Severa. As a central theme or a mere side note, fado accompanied cinema production until the 1970s. In fact, the Portuguese cinema showed particular interest in the fado universe in 1947 with O Fado, História de uma Cantadeira, starred by Amália Rodrigues or in 1963, with O Miúdo da Bica, starred by Fernando Farinha. Despite the protagonism of Amália Rodrigues, the participations of artists like Fernando Farinha, Hermínia Silva, Berta Cardoso, Deolinda Rodrigues, Raul Nery and Jaime Santos in the Seventh Art are also noteworthy. And if radio broadcasting allowed to go beyond geographical barriers, taking the voices of fado to thousands of people, when Rádio Televisão Portuguesa was inaugurated in 1957 – and specially when the broadcast became national in the mid-1970s - the faces of the artists would become known by the general public. Recreating environments connected to fado themes inside the study, television broadcasted regularly, between 1959 and 1974, with live feeds of fado shows which would undoubtedly contribute to its mediatization. Enjoying the diffusion on the Teatro de Revista stages since the last quart of the 19th century, and the promotion on the specialized press since the first decades of the 20th century, Fado became progressively mediatized by the radio, cinema, and television. It gained great strength between the 1940s and 1960, often called the golden years.. The annual contest Grande Noite do Fado began in 1953, lasting until our days. Gathering hundreds of candidates from several organizations and associations of the city, this contest is traditionally held at Coliseu dos Recreios and is still today an important event to the fado tradition of Lisbon and the promotion of young amateurs who try to rise to the professional status. The exponents of the national song were at the time attached to a network of typical houses with regular casts. But now they had a broader working market with many possibilities of discographic recording, tours, performances at radio and television. In parallel, there were performances by fado singers at “Serões para Trabalhadores”, cultural events broadcast by the radio and promoted by FNAT since 1942. Fado programmes were also promoted by the Secretariado Nacional de Informação, Cultura e Turismo which became responsible for the Censhorship, Emissora Nacional, and Inspecção Geral dos Espectáculos in 1944. In the 1950s, the regime’s approach to the international success of Amália Rodrigues strengthened the collage of the regime to fado, after changing it deeply. The simplicity of Fado’s melodic structure values the voice interpretation, and also sublimes the sung repertoires. With a strong evocative inclination, fado’s poetry appeals to the communion between the interpreter, the musicians and the listeners. In quatrains or improvised quatrains, five-verse stanzas, six-verse stanzas, decasyllables and alexandrine verses, this popular poetry evokes themes related to love, luck, individual fate, and the city’s daily narrative. Sensitive to social injustice, Fado gained interventionist contours on many occasions. And although the first Fado lyrics were mostly anonymous, successively transmitted by oral tradition, this would definitely be reverted in the mid-1920s, when several popular poets emerged, such as Henrique Rego, João da Mata, Gabriel de Oliveira, Frederico de Brito, Carlos Conde and João Linhares Barbosa, who gave special attention to fado. In the 1950s, fado would definitely cross the path of erudite poetry in the voice of Amália Rodrigues. After the decisive contribution of the composer Alain Oulman, fado began singing texts of poets with academic education and published literary works, such as David Mourão-Ferreira, Pedro Homem de Mello, José Régio, Luiz de Macedo, and later Alexandre O.Neill, Sidónio Muralha, Leonel Neves and Vasco de Lima Couto, among many others. The international divulgation of Fado had begun in the mid-1930s. Fado spread towards the African continent and Brazil, preferred performing destinations of some artists such as Ercília Costa, Berta Cardoso, Madalena de Melo, Armando Augusto Freire, Martinho d’Assunção and João da Mata, among others. However, the internationalization of fado would only consolidate in the 1950s, especially thanks to Amália Rodrigues. Surpassing the cultural and language barriers, Fado would definitely become a national culture icon with Amália. For decades and until her death, in 1999, Amália Rodrigues was its national and international star. The April 1974 Revolution instituted a democratic State in Portugal, founded on the assumption of the integration of public liberties, respect and guaranty of individual rights with the inherent opening of a more active civic, political and social participation to citizens. As a result of the global society, the mass culture influences would be felt progressively over the following decades. This context modified fado’s relation with the Portuguese market, centred on popular music with an intervening character while simultaneously absorbing many of the musical forms created abroad. In the years immediately after the revolution, the two years interruption of the contest Grande Noite do Fado and the radical decrease of fado’s presence at radio or television broadcasts testify the hostility towards fado. In fact, only when the democratic regime became stable, in 1976, would fado regain its own space. The following year the album Um Homem na Cidade was released by one of the biggest names of Lisbon’s urban song, a central figure of fado’s internationalization. As no other, the owner of a solid 45 years career has articulated the most legitimate fado tradition to an unending ability to recreate it. As the ideological debate around fado gradually comes to an end, it was mostly since the 1980s thatfado consenso is recognized its central position in the scene of the Portuguese musical patrimony. The market showed a renewed interest for Lisbon.s urban song, as testified by the increasing attention given by the discographic industry through the re-edition of recorded registries, fado.s gradual interpretation in the popular festivities circuits at a regional scale, the progressive appearance of a new generation of interpreters, and even the approach of singers from other areas to fado such as José Mário Branco, Sérgio Godinho, António Variações and Paulo de Carvalho. In the years immediately after the revolution, the two years’ interruption of the contest Grande Noite do Fado and the radical decrease of fado’s presence at radio or television broadcasts testify the hostility towards fado. In fact, only when the democratic regime became stable, in 1976, would fado regain its own space. The following year the albumUm Homem na Cidade was released by one of the biggest names of Lisbon’s urban song, a central figure of fado’s internationalization. As no other, the owner of a solid 45 years career has articulated the most legitimate fado tradition to an unending ability to recreate it. As the ideological debate around fado gradually comes to an end, it was mostly since the 1980s that fado consenso is recognized its central position in the scene of the Portuguese musical patrimony. The market showed a renewed interest for Lisbon.s urban song, as testified by the increasing attention given by the discographic industry through the re-edition of recorded registries, fado.s gradual interpretation in the popular festivities circuits at a regional scale, the progressive appearance of a new generation of interpreters, and even the approach of singers from other areas to fado such as José Mário Branco, Sérgio Godinho, António Variações and Paulo de Carvalho. Internationally there is also a renewed interest in local musical cultures. Amália Rodrigues and Carlos do Carmo are notorious among fado most famous names in the record industry, the media and live shows. In the 1990s, fado would definitely cement its position in the international World Music circuits with Mísia and Cristina Branco, in the French and the Dutch circuits, respectively. Another emerging name in Fado.s panorama is Camané. In the 1990s and the turn of the century a new generation of talented interpreters appears: Mafalda Arnauth, Katia Guerreiro, Maria Ana Bobone, Joana Amendoeira, Ana Moura, Ana Sofia Varela, Pedro Moutinho, Helder Moutinho, Gonçalo Salgueiro, António Zambujo, Miguel Capucho, Rodrigo Costa Félix, Patrícia Rodrigues, and Raquel Tavares. In the international circuit, however, it is Mariza who conquers an absolute protagonism, drawing a fulgurant pathway during which she has won successive prizes in the World Music category. Excertos do texto: Pereira, Sara (2008), “Circuito Museológico”, in Museu do Fado, Lisboa: EGEAC/Museu do Fado I´m a consulting manager in a medical care entreprise. I have a degree in Chemistry Engeneering in FCT - Universidade Nova de Lisboa. I´m a snowboard FAN.
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