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What kind of taxes do I need to pay as an experience host in China?

These information pages can help you get started in learning about some of the laws and registration requirements that may apply to your experiences on Airbnb. These pages include summaries of some of the rules that may apply to different sorts of activities, and contain links to government resources that you may find helpful.

Please understand that these information pages are not comprehensive, and are not legal advice. If you are unsure about how local laws or this information may apply to you or your Experience, we encourage you to check with official sources or seek legal advice.

Please note that we don’t update this information in real time, so you should confirm that the laws or procedures have not changed recently.*

What kind of taxes do I need to pay as an experience host?

If you're an experience host, you should make sure you understand each of the following types of taxes, and pay the ones that apply to your experience:

You may be able to deduct your expenses from income taxes, so you should keep receipts of the costs of running your experiences.

Value added taxes

Do I need to collect any value added taxes from guests if I’m hosting an experience outside of the United States?

Taxes can be complicated, and you should take time to understand the rules as they apply to you and your particular situation.

The Value Added Tax, or VAT, in the European Union, China, and many other countries is a general, broadly based consumption tax assessed on the value added to goods and services. It applies more or less to all goods and services that are bought and sold for use or consumption. In Japan, there is a similar tax called the Japanese Consumption Tax, or JCT.

If your country of residence is part of the European Union or China, you may need to assess VAT on the services or goods you provide. If your country of residence is in Japan, you may need to assess JCT. We encourage you to consult a tax advisor in your area for more insight or if you need assistance assessing VAT or JCT on the services you provide.

Value added taxes apply to my experience. How do I determine how much tax I need to collect from my Guests?

VAT and JCT rates are calculated according to the local rate of the customer's country of residence. VAT and JCT rates change periodically. We recommend you check with your local tax authority to get the most up to date rates for the country where you are required to pay VAT or JCT. More information about VAT rates in the European Union can be found here. More information about JCT rates can be found here. More information about VAT rates in South Korea can be found here.

Value added taxes apply to my experience. How do I collect taxes from guests?

As an Airbnb host, if you determine that you need to collect VAT or JCT, you can do so by asking your guests to pay it in person. In each case, it's important that you tell your guests of the exact tax amount in your Listing, so they know the amount before they book. If you choose to collect VAT or JCT in person, please note that you need to collect it directly from your Guests at the beginning of your experience.

Value added taxes apply to my experience. How do I file and pay my taxes?

You may need to register for a valid VAT or JCT ID within your country of residence. More information about the registration and filing process in the European Union can be found here. More information about the registration and filing process in Japan can be found here. More information about the registration and filing process in South Korea can be found here.

Income taxes

Are there any income taxes I have to pay for experiences I host?

As a host, you may have to pay national and state income taxes. We expect all hosts to comply with the tax regulations in their area, and encourage you to speak to a tax professional if you need advice on income taxes.

Deducting expenses

What expenses can I deduct from my income taxes?

It's possible that not all of your earnings as a host are taxable as income. You may be able to deduct the cost of your supplies, amounts you paid to other service providers like restaurants or entertainment venues, insurance costs, and other expenses.

We encourage you to speak to a tax advisor for more details, as there are many special rules in this area and we aren't able to provide tax advice.

*Airbnb is not responsible for the reliability or correctness of the information contained in any links to third party sites (including any links to legislation and regulations).